ipa tkdu/bahasa inggris/2008

Welcome to your ipa tkdu/bahasa inggris/2008

We all know that mobile phones, cellphones, hand-phones whatever we want to call them (anti shouldn’t we all be calling them the same thing?) are changing our lives. But it takes a god old-fashioned survey to wake us up to the glaring reality: they have changed who we are. The mobile phone has indeed changed the way we behave. But perhaps we don’t realize how much we. have become its slave. Consider other elements of the Siemens 5 Mobile Survey: With the exception of Australia, in every, country surveyed the majority polled said they would go back for their phone if they left it at home (in Australia it was a respectable 39%). If you’ve endured the traffic in Indonesia the Philippines and India, you’ll kow what kind of sacrifice some two-thirds of those surveyed are making. I can’t think of anything I would go back for - except my wallet, maybe, or my clothes.

          And even if we remember to bring it, we’re still not happy. Many of us get anxious if it hasn’t rung or a text 10 massage hasn’t appeared for a while (a while being about an hour). Once again of those surveyed Indonesians (65%) and Filipinos (77%) get particularly jittery. Australians are more laid back about this (20%), but every other user in Asia seems to be glancing at the phone every few seconds. This statistic, I have to say is highly believable, and the instinct highly annoying. There’s nothing worse than chatting to someone who constantly checks his or her hand-phone.

           Then there’s the fact that mobile phones are not only enslaving the user, they’re trampling the rights of everyone else. Around a third of folk surveyed acknowledge they get so engrossed in mobile conversations that they’re often unaware of speaking loudly while discussing their private lives in public. At least most of us agree on one thing: With the exception of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, the increasing use of mobile phones has led to a decline us courtesy and considerate behaviour.

        The bottom line here is that we are more than a litle bit out of control. Mobile phones arc great: but if we allow them to dominate our lives to this extent - interrupting conversations with those around us to take a call, staring at .our phones rather than relating to the world and people around us, sending flirty text massages to random numbers - then I can only assume that in another 10 years, society as we know it will no longer exist. All we’ll see is a blur of digital data going out and having all the fun, socializing, falling in love and taking sneaky pictures of each other.

Which of the following statements is NOT TRUE about cellphones?

We all know that mobile phones, cellphones, hand-phones whatever we want to call them (anti shouldn’t we all be calling them the same thing?) are changing our lives. But it takes a god old-fashioned survey to wake us up to the glaring reality: they have changed who we are. The mobile phone has indeed changed the way we behave. But perhaps we don’t realize how much we. have become its slave. Consider other elements of the Siemens 5 Mobile Survey: With the exception of Australia, in every, country surveyed the majority polled said they would go back for their phone if they left it at home (in Australia it was a respectable 39%). If you’ve endured the traffic in Indonesia the Philippines and India, you’ll kow what kind of sacrifice some two-thirds of those surveyed are making. I can’t think of anything I would go back for - except my wallet, maybe, or my clothes.

          And even if we remember to bring it, we’re still not happy. Many of us get anxious if it hasn’t rung or a text 10 massage hasn’t appeared for a while (a while being about an hour). Once again of those surveyed Indonesians (65%) and Filipinos (77%) get particularly jittery. Australians are more laid back about this (20%), but every other user in Asia seems to be glancing at the phone every few seconds. This statistic, I have to say is highly believable, and the instinct highly annoying. There’s nothing worse than chatting to someone who constantly checks his or her hand-phone.

           Then there’s the fact that mobile phones are not only enslaving the user, they’re trampling the rights of everyone else. Around a third of folk surveyed acknowledge they get so engrossed in mobile conversations that they’re often unaware of speaking loudly while discussing their private lives in public. At least most of us agree on one thing: With the exception of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, the increasing use of mobile phones has led to a decline us courtesy and considerate behaviour.

        The bottom line here is that we are more than a litle bit out of control. Mobile phones arc great: but if we allow them to dominate our lives to this extent - interrupting conversations with those around us to take a call, staring at .our phones rather than relating to the world and people around us, sending flirty text massages to random numbers - then I can only assume that in another 10 years, society as we know it will no longer exist. All we’ll see is a blur of digital data going out and having all the fun, socializing, falling in love and taking sneaky pictures of each other.

The inain purpose of the writer is' to inform the readers about ?

We all know that mobile phones, cellphones, hand-phones whatever we want to call them (anti shouldn’t we all be calling them the same thing?) are changing our lives. But it takes a god old-fashioned survey to wake us up to the glaring reality: they have changed who we are. The mobile phone has indeed changed the way we behave. But perhaps we don’t realize how much we. have become its slave. Consider other elements of the Siemens 5 Mobile Survey: With the exception of Australia, in every, country surveyed the majority polled said they would go back for their phone if they left it at home (in Australia it was a respectable 39%). If you’ve endured the traffic in Indonesia the Philippines and India, you’ll kow what kind of sacrifice some two-thirds of those surveyed are making. I can’t think of anything I would go back for - except my wallet, maybe, or my clothes.

          And even if we remember to bring it, we’re still not happy. Many of us get anxious if it hasn’t rung or a text 10 massage hasn’t appeared for a while (a while being about an hour). Once again of those surveyed Indonesians (65%) and Filipinos (77%) get particularly jittery. Australians are more laid back about this (20%), but every other user in Asia seems to be glancing at the phone every few seconds. This statistic, I have to say is highly believable, and the instinct highly annoying. There’s nothing worse than chatting to someone who constantly checks his or her hand-phone.

           Then there’s the fact that mobile phones are not only enslaving the user, they’re trampling the rights of everyone else. Around a third of folk surveyed acknowledge they get so engrossed in mobile conversations that they’re often unaware of speaking loudly while discussing their private lives in public. At least most of us agree on one thing: With the exception of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, the increasing use of mobile phones has led to a decline us courtesy and considerate behaviour.

        The bottom line here is that we are more than a litle bit out of control. Mobile phones arc great: but if we allow them to dominate our lives to this extent - interrupting conversations with those around us to take a call, staring at .our phones rather than relating to the world and people around us, sending flirty text massages to random numbers - then I can only assume that in another 10 years, society as we know it will no longer exist. All we’ll see is a blur of digital data going out and having all the fun, socializing, falling in love and taking sneaky pictures of each other.

Cellphones have not only enslaved the users but have also?

  We all know that mobile phones, cellphones, hand-phones whatever we want to call them (anti shouldn’t we all be calling them the same thing?) are changing our lives. But it takes a god old-fashioned survey to wake us up to the glaring reality: they have changed who we are. The mobile phone has indeed changed the way we behave. But perhaps we don’t realize how much we. have become its slave. Consider other elements of the Siemens 5 Mobile Survey: With the exception of Australia, in every, country surveyed the majority polled said they would go back for their phone if they left it at home (in Australia it was a respectable 39%). If you’ve endured the traffic in Indonesia the Philippines and India, you’ll kow what kind of sacrifice some two-thirds of those surveyed are making. I can’t think of anything I would go back for - except my wallet, maybe, or my clothes.

          And even if we remember to bring it, we’re still not happy. Many of us get anxious if it hasn’t rung or a text 10 massage hasn’t appeared for a while (a while being about an hour). Once again of those surveyed Indonesians (65%) and Filipinos (77%) get particularly jittery. Australians are more laid back about this (20%), but every other user in Asia seems to be glancing at the phone every few seconds. This statistic, I have to say is highly believable, and the instinct highly annoying. There’s nothing worse than chatting to someone who constantly checks his or her hand-phone.

           Then there’s the fact that mobile phones are not only enslaving the user, they’re trampling the rights of everyone else. Around a third of folk surveyed acknowledge they get so engrossed in mobile conversations that they’re often unaware of speaking loudly while discussing their private lives in public. At least most of us agree on one thing: With the exception of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, the increasing use of mobile phones has led to a decline us courtesy and considerate behaviour.

        The bottom line here is that we are more than a litle bit out of control. Mobile phones arc great: but if we allow them to dominate our lives to this extent - interrupting conversations with those around us to take a call, staring at .our phones rather than relating to the world and people around us, sending flirty text massages to random numbers - then I can only assume that in another 10 years, society as we know it will no longer exist. All we’ll see is a blur of digital data going out and having all the fun, socializing, falling in love and taking sneaky pictures of each other.

What makes Asian users of cellphones different from Australian ones?

    We all know that mobile phones, cellphones, hand-phones whatever we want to call them (anti shouldn’t we all be calling them the same thing?) are changing our lives. But it takes a god old-fashioned survey to wake us up to the glaring reality: they have changed who we are. The mobile phone has indeed changed the way we behave. But perhaps we don’t realize how much we. have become its slave. Consider other elements of the Siemens 5 Mobile Survey: With the exception of Australia, in every, country surveyed the majority polled said they would go back for their phone if they left it at home (in Australia it was a respectable 39%). If you’ve endured the traffic in Indonesia the Philippines and India, you’ll kow what kind of sacrifice some two-thirds of those surveyed are making. I can’t think of anything I would go back for - except my wallet, maybe, or my clothes.

          And even if we remember to bring it, we’re still not happy. Many of us get anxious if it hasn’t rung or a text 10 massage hasn’t appeared for a while (a while being about an hour). Once again of those surveyed Indonesians (65%) and Filipinos (77%) get particularly jittery. Australians are more laid back about this (20%), but every other user in Asia seems to be glancing at the phone every few seconds. This statistic, I have to say is highly believable, and the instinct highly annoying. There’s nothing worse than chatting to someone who constantly checks his or her hand-phone.

           Then there’s the fact that mobile phones are not only enslaving the user, they’re trampling the rights of everyone else. Around a third of folk surveyed acknowledge they get so engrossed in mobile conversations that they’re often unaware of speaking loudly while discussing their private lives in public. At least most of us agree on one thing: With the exception of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, the increasing use of mobile phones has led to a decline us courtesy and considerate behaviour.

        The bottom line here is that we are more than a litle bit out of control. Mobile phones arc great: but if we allow them to dominate our lives to this extent - interrupting conversations with those around us to take a call, staring at .our phones rather than relating to the world and people around us, sending flirty text massages to random numbers - then I can only assume that in another 10 years, society as we know it will no longer exist. All we’ll see is a blur of digital data going out and having all the fun, socializing, falling in love and taking sneaky pictures of each other.

The phrase ‘trampling the rights of everyone else’ in lines 23-24 means ?

Due to the cases of Salmonella food poisoning in Europe, the sale of duck eggs reached its lowest point in the 1970’s. Although it was never conclusively shown that duck eggs were to blame, the egg-eating public stopped buying and many egg producers went bankrupt. Indeed, there is a risk of Salmonella poisoning when ducks lay their eggs in damp conditions, such as on ground that is constantly wet, but the same can be said for the eggs of hens. Moreover, commercial duck production in France and England where the outbreaks of Salmonella poisoning took place, followed the same standards as those used in the hen industry, which experienced no Salmonella problems. Storage of eggs, whether those of hen or duck, can also be a factor in contamination. Studies have found that bacterial growth reaches potentially dangerous levels at storage temperatures of 50°C or greater. .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

With which of the following sentences should the paragraph, end?

Due to the cases of Salmonella food poisoning in Europe, the sale of duck eggs reached its lowest point in the 1970’s. Although it was never conclusively shown that duck eggs were to blame, the egg-eating public stopped buying and many egg producers went bankrupt. Indeed, there is a risk of Salmonella poisoning when ducks lay their eggs in damp conditions, such as on ground that is constantly wet, but the same can be said for the eggs of hens. Moreover, commercial duck production in France and England
where the outbreaks of Salmonella poisoning took place, followed the same standards as those used in the hen industry, which experienced no Salmonella problems. Storage of eggs, whether those of hen or duck, can also be a factor in contamination. Studies have found that bacterial growth reaches potentially dangerous levels at storage temperatures of 50°C or greater.

What is the topic of the paragraph?

(l)___________._______________________________:__________________________ ___________________

(2) Biodiesel is free of lead, contains virtualy no sulphur and produces lower quantities of cancercausing emissions than petrodiesel. (3) In paticular, using biodiesel in school buses makes a lot of sense. (4) Young children are more
susceptible than adults to the toxic and potentially cancer-causing emissions from petrodiesel. (5) Many teachers are also suffering from asthma, (6) this fact has led more than 50 school boards across nation to require that their buses use biodiesel fuel. (7) This cleaner-burning fuel is also an attractive option in recreation areas. (8) Yellowstone National Park was the first national park to test biodiesel as a fuel, and the project was a such success that the National Park Service has introduced biodiesel to 20 other parks across the country.

Which sentence does not belong in the paragraph?

(l)___________._______________________________:__________________________ ___________________

(2) Biodiesel is free of lead, contains virtualy no sulphur and produces lower quantities of cancercausing emissions than petrodiesel. (3) In paticular, using biodiesel in school buses makes a lot of sense. (4) Young children are more
susceptible than adults to the toxic and potentially cancer-causing emissions from petrodiesel. (5) Many teachers are also suffering from asthma, (6) this fact has led more than 50 school boards across nation to require that their buses use biodiesel fuel. (7) This cleaner-burning fuel is also an attractive option in recreation areas. (8) Yellowstone National Park was the first national park to test biodiesel as a fuel, and the project was a such success that the National Park Service has introduced biodiesel to 20 other parks across the country.

With which of the folowing sentences should the ' paragraph begin?

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

 

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

Small genetic differences make one person different from another. Now medical researchers have a new map to help them find these (60)_______. This is possible because some time ago more than two hundred scientists from six nations (61)___________ the Hap Map. The name comes from the word haplotypc. A haplotype is a group of differences that are (62) _______ to come close together, in a block. These blocks (63)____________. to pass from parent to child. The Hap Map scientists hope to identify up to six million DNA differences (64)__________ they finish. The scientists say the findings may lead to (65)___________ genes that cause common diseases like diabetes and heart disease. (66) _________ diseases to genes could lead to new treatments. (67)___________ people will be able to know if they have an increased risk of a disease because of their genes.

 

You didn’t like the horror film you saw yesterday did you?’
‘You’re right. I really wish__’

For the past few years of the last decade the rate of crime has been high due to the increase in the rate of unemployment. Today people wish that the local government first priority to' the solution of this problem.

More government policies related to people’s welfare to help people who have suffered because of the drastic oil price hike.

‘Your car is badly damaged; I need more than two days to repair it’ [‘it’s OK, , then.’]

‘I get bored with all the things 1 do in my office after 5

years of working as secretary of the Dean.’ ‘_________’

 

So far this term, the students in the writing class have learned how to write thesis statements, __________ , and summarize their conclusions’

‘What should the government do to create political stability?’ ‘______’

“I’m ashamed because now all my family secrets are exposed in court.’
“You___________your neighbour for such a trival case.’

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