ipa tkdu/binggris/2007

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More than one-third of foreign students graduating from Australian universities, mainly Asians, have such poor linglish skills they should never have been admitted, research showed A study by demographer Bob Birrell found that more than 50 percent of-Soufh Korean, and 'fhai students did not have sufficient English to work professionally in Australia, along with more than 43 percent of Chinese graduates. Some 5 1? percent of students■ from Singapore and India, where English is more widely spoken, also failed to reach the
required level. Overall, 34 percent of the graduating foreign students offered permanent residence visas in 2006 did not have competent English.
13h'rell ofMelbourne’s Monash University, said almost all the 12.000 graduates tested for fire survey were from Asia because these students are the most likely to apply for permanent residency on completing their studies. 10 However, he said that he believed the study to be representative of all foreign students, partly because Asia was a major source of fee-paying overseas students for Australian universities. ‘It docs raise questions about university standards,’ Birrell told AFP. d'ertiary institutions are reliant on international students because they proyide 15 percent of funding, leading to suggestions that academic standards are sacrificed in favor of financial rewards.
Education Minister Julie iBishop described the survey as “an extraordinary attack by Professor Birrell on our 15 ؛ ' ‘International students must meet international be^hrnarks in language in order to get a place in a
university in Australia,’ she said '؛'he study found all graduates tested had enough command of the language to cope in most situations. ‘But people who have reached this standard are still not capable of conducting a sophisticated discourse at the professional level.’ it said.
In his said there wasra “mountain of anecdotal material” that many overseas studebts struggle
<؛26
20 to meet their course requirements and that universities cope by lowering the English demands of the courses, ‘'fhere is widening reeognifion of the English problem,’ he said. ‘But universities were hesitant to make students take extra language courses because this would make them more expensive and therefore less attractive than rival institutions,’ he said. I'lowever, Professor Gerard Sutton, the president of the Australian Vice-Chancellors Committee, said most foreign students would be proficient in reading, writing and listening to linglish. ‘What 1 think has been highlighted is a deficiency in spoken language,’ he told AFP, adding that a deficiency in this area wbuld not prevent them feom completing a university eourse.

The respondents of the survey were

More than one-third of foreign students graduating from Australian universities, mainly Asians, have such poor linglish skills they should never have been admitted, research showed A study by demographer Bob Birrell found that more than 50 percent of-Soufh Korean, and 'fhai students did not have sufficient English to work professionally in Australia, along with more than 43 percent of Chinese graduates. Some 5 1? percent of students■ from Singapore and India, where English is more widely spoken, also failed to reach the
required level. Overall, 34 percent of the graduating foreign students offered permanent residence visas in 2006 did not have competent English.
13h'rell ofMelbourne’s Monash University, said almost all the 12.000 graduates tested for fire survey were from Asia because these students are the most likely to apply for permanent residency on completing their studies. 10 However, he said that he believed the study to be representative of all foreign students, partly because Asia was a major source of fee-paying overseas students for Australian universities. ‘It docs raise questions about university standards,’ Birrell told AFP. d'ertiary institutions are reliant on international students because they proyide 15 percent of funding, leading to suggestions that academic standards are sacrificed in favor of financial rewards.
Education Minister Julie iBishop described the survey as “an extraordinary attack by Professor Birrell on our 15 ؛ ' ‘International students must meet international be^hrnarks in language in order to get a place in a
university in Australia,’ she said '؛'he study found all graduates tested had enough command of the language to cope in most situations. ‘But people who have reached this standard are still not capable of conducting a sophisticated discourse at the professional level.’ it said.
In his said there wasra “mountain of anecdotal material” that many overseas studebts struggle
<؛26
20 to meet their course requirements and that universities cope by lowering the English demands of the courses, ‘'fhere is widening reeognifion of the English problem,’ he said. ‘But universities were hesitant to make students take extra language courses because this would make them more expensive and therefore less attractive than rival institutions,’ he said. I'lowever, Professor Gerard Sutton, the president of the Australian Vice-Chancellors Committee, said most foreign students would be proficient in reading, writing and listening to linglish. ‘What 1 think has been highlighted is a deficiency in spoken language,’ he told AFP, adding that a deficiency in this area wbuld not prevent them feom completing a university eourse.

This passage is probably taken from .

More than one-third of foreign students graduating from Australian universities, mainly Asians, have such poor linglish skills they should never have been admitted, research showed A study by demographer Bob Birrell found that more than 50 percent of-Soufh Korean, and 'fhai students did not have sufficient English to work professionally in Australia, along with more than 43 percent of Chinese graduates. Some 5 1? percent of students■ from Singapore and India, where English is more widely spoken, also failed to reach the
required level. Overall, 34 percent of the graduating foreign students offered permanent residence visas in 2006 did not have competent English.
13h'rell ofMelbourne’s Monash University, said almost all the 12.000 graduates tested for fire survey were from Asia because these students are the most likely to apply for permanent residency on completing their studies. 10 However, he said that he believed the study to be representative of all foreign students, partly because Asia was a major source of fee-paying overseas students for Australian universities. ‘It docs raise questions about university standards,’ Birrell told AFP. d'ertiary institutions are reliant on international students because they proyide 15 percent of funding, leading to suggestions that academic standards are sacrificed in favor of financial rewards.
Education Minister Julie iBishop described the survey as “an extraordinary attack by Professor Birrell on our 15 ؛ ' ‘International students must meet international be^hrnarks in language in order to get a place in a
university in Australia,’ she said '؛'he study found all graduates tested had enough command of the language to cope in most situations. ‘But people who have reached this standard are still not capable of conducting a sophisticated discourse at the professional level.’ it said.
In his said there wasra “mountain of anecdotal material” that many overseas studebts struggle
<؛26
20 to meet their course requirements and that universities cope by lowering the English demands of the courses, ‘'fhere is widening reeognifion of the English problem,’ he said. ‘But universities were hesitant to make students take extra language courses because this would make them more expensive and therefore less attractive than rival institutions,’ he said. I'lowever, Professor Gerard Sutton, the president of the Australian Vice-Chancellors Committee, said most foreign students would be proficient in reading, writing and listening to linglish. ‘What 1 think has been highlighted is a deficiency in spoken language,’ he told AFP, adding that a deficiency in this area wbuld not prevent them feom completing a university eourse.

Which of the following statements is FALSE about Asian students studying in Australian universities?

More than one-third of foreign students graduating from Australian universities, mainly Asians, have such poor linglish skills they should never have been admitted, research showed A study by demographer Bob Birrell found that more than 50 percent of-Soufh Korean, and 'fhai students did not have sufficient English to work professionally in Australia, along with more than 43 percent of Chinese graduates. Some 5 1? percent of students■ from Singapore and India, where English is more widely spoken, also failed to reach the
required level. Overall, 34 percent of the graduating foreign students offered permanent residence visas in 2006 did not have competent English.
13h'rell ofMelbourne’s Monash University, said almost all the 12.000 graduates tested for fire survey were from Asia because these students are the most likely to apply for permanent residency on completing their studies. 10 However, he said that he believed the study to be representative of all foreign students, partly because Asia was a major source of fee-paying overseas students for Australian universities. ‘It docs raise questions about university standards,’ Birrell told AFP. d'ertiary institutions are reliant on international students because they proyide 15 percent of funding, leading to suggestions that academic standards are sacrificed in favor of financial rewards.
Education Minister Julie iBishop described the survey as “an extraordinary attack by Professor Birrell on our 15 ؛ ' ‘International students must meet international be^hrnarks in language in order to get a place in a
university in Australia,’ she said '؛'he study found all graduates tested had enough command of the language to cope in most situations. ‘But people who have reached this standard are still not capable of conducting a sophisticated discourse at the professional level.’ it said.
In his said there wasra “mountain of anecdotal material” that many overseas studebts struggle
<؛26
20 to meet their course requirements and that universities cope by lowering the English demands of the courses, ‘'fhere is widening reeognifion of the English problem,’ he said. ‘But universities were hesitant to make students take extra language courses because this would make them more expensive and therefore less attractive than rival institutions,’ he said. I'lowever, Professor Gerard Sutton, the president of the Australian Vice-Chancellors Committee, said most foreign students would be proficient in reading, writing and listening to linglish. ‘What 1 think has been highlighted is a deficiency in spoken language,’ he told AFP, adding that a deficiency in this area wbuld not prevent them feom completing a university eourse.

Which of the following statements is FALSE about Asian students studying in Australian universities?

More than one-third of foreign students graduating from Australian universities, mainly Asians, have such poor linglish skills they should never have been admitted, research showed A study by demographer Bob Birrell found that more than 50 percent of-Soufh Korean, and 'fhai students did not have sufficient English to work professionally in Australia, along with more than 43 percent of Chinese graduates. Some 5 1? percent of students■ from Singapore and India, where English is more widely spoken, also failed to reach the
required level. Overall, 34 percent of the graduating foreign students offered permanent residence visas in 2006 did not have competent English.
13h'rell ofMelbourne’s Monash University, said almost all the 12.000 graduates tested for fire survey were from Asia because these students are the most likely to apply for permanent residency on completing their studies. 10 However, he said that he believed the study to be representative of all foreign students, partly because Asia was a major source of fee-paying overseas students for Australian universities. ‘It docs raise questions about university standards,’ Birrell told AFP. d'ertiary institutions are reliant on international students because they proyide 15 percent of funding, leading to suggestions that academic standards are sacrificed in favor of financial rewards.
Education Minister Julie iBishop described the survey as “an extraordinary attack by Professor Birrell on our 15 ؛ ' ‘International students must meet international be^hrnarks in language in order to get a place in a
university in Australia,’ she said '؛'he study found all graduates tested had enough command of the language to cope in most situations. ‘But people who have reached this standard are still not capable of conducting a sophisticated discourse at the professional level.’ it said.
In his said there wasra “mountain of anecdotal material” that many overseas studebts struggle
<؛26
20 to meet their course requirements and that universities cope by lowering the English demands of the courses, ‘'fhere is widening reeognifion of the English problem,’ he said. ‘But universities were hesitant to make students take extra language courses because this would make them more expensive and therefore less attractive than rival institutions,’ he said. I'lowever, Professor Gerard Sutton, the president of the Australian Vice-Chancellors Committee, said most foreign students would be proficient in reading, writing and listening to linglish. ‘What 1 think has been highlighted is a deficiency in spoken language,’ he told AFP, adding that a deficiency in this area wbuld not prevent them feom completing a university eourse.

The minister of Education thinks that the report is anattack on Australian Universities because it

Some have to-do with the environment. For example, coffee that is grown in the shade supports a wide variety of bird spe- cies, but few or no birds live among plants grown in full sun. For this reason, many people support the “shade” method of growing coffee, ©؛her issues am related to labor. Although coffee consumers often lead very comfortable lives, in the coffee-producing communities ofLatin America andAfrica, life can be Very difficult, with hard physical work, little in- come and few basic services. History shows us that violent conflict can occur when groups fight each other for control of important resources such as oil, gold, and water. s؛،،lty, areas where coffee is grown are sometimes also places of policitical unrest and hardship.

 

With which of the following sentences should the para-
graph begin?

Some have to-do with the environment. For example, coffee that is grown in the shade supports a wide variety of bird spe- cies, but few or no birds live among plants grown in full sun. For this reason, many people support the “shade” method of growing coffee, ©؛her issues am related to labor. Although coffee consumers often lead very comfortable lives, in the coffee-producing communities ofLatin America andAfrica, life can be Very difficult, with hard physical work, little in- come and few basic services. History shows us that violent conflict can occur when groups fight each other for control of important resources such as oil, gold, and water. s؛،،lty, areas where coffee is grown are sometimes also places of policitical unrest and hardship.

What is the paragraph following the above text most
probably about?

(1) Maccines arc developed to fight diseases. (2) For example, when آه disease bacteria are dead, or they have lost then danger, they can be used for good purposes. (3) Fasteur discovered that inactive bacteria, if introduced back i'nto آه body by means of inoculation, can have beneficial effects and speed up آه development of our natural defences, the antibodies which arc capable of fighting and blocking an invading disease. (4) So the same bacteria that produce a disease can also produce in us آه extra defences our body heads to fight against the disease. (5) Louis pastcur was the great French chemist and biologist who saved a nmc-year-old boy from Alsace in France.

The sentence which is irrelevant to the topic in t,he text above is sentence number

(1) Maccines arc developed to fight diseases. (2) For example, when آه disease bacteria are dead, or they have lost then danger, they can be used for good purposes. (3) Fasteur discovered that inactive bacteria, if introduced back i'nto body by means of inoculation, can have beneficial effects and speed up development of our natural defences, the antibodies which arc capable of fighting and blocking an invading disease. (4) So the same bacteria that produce a disease can also produce in use extra defences our body heads to fight against the disease. (5) Louis pastcur was the great French chemist and biologist who saved a nmc-year-old boy from Alsace in France.

the main information of the text tells us about ____.

solar energy reaching the earth each year is over 30,000 times as much as ءه total energy used by man. liven a very small satellite in orbit round آه parth can be used (60) twice as much electricity as the largest (61) power station, !for a long time men (62) to use solar energy because sunshine is not something which is constant and thus always available, especially in temperate and cold climates. The direction of آه sun’s rays varies, too, however, during the past two hundred years significant _(63)_ have been made in the use of solar energy _(64)_ heat and mom recently to produce electricity During the nineteenth century, (65) solar steam generators were built. These generators consisted of mirrors thrit could be moved and could thus concentrate large amounts of (66) from آه sun on blackened pipes through which water was circulated. In this way the water was turned to steam. Even ice (67) by a similar method a hundred years ago in Paris.

(1) Maccines arc developed to fight diseases. (2) For example, when  disease bacteria are dead, or they have lost then danger, they can be used for good purposes. (3) Fasteur discovered that inactive bacteria, if introduced back i'nto  body by means of inoculation, can have beneficial effects and speed up  development of our natural defences, the antibodies which arc capable of fighting and blocking an invading disease. (4) So the same bacteria that produce a disease can also produce in us extra defences our body heads to fight against the disease. (5) Louis pastcur was the great French chemist and biologist who saved a nmc-year-old boy from Alsace in France.

(1) Maccines arc developed to fight diseases. (2) For example, when disease bacteria are dead, or they have lost then danger, they can be used for good purposes. (3) Fasteur discovered that inactive bacteria, if introduced back i'nto  body by means of inoculation, can have beneficial effects and speed up  development of our natural defences, the antibodies which arc capable of fighting and blocking an invading disease. (4) So the same bacteria that produce a disease can also produce in us آه extra defences our body heads to fight against the disease. (5) Louis pastcur was the great French chemist and biologist who saved a nmc-year-old boy from Alsace in France.

(1) Maccines arc developed to fight diseases. (2) For example, when  disease bacteria are dead, or they have lost then danger, they can be used for good purposes. (3) Fasteur discovered that inactive bacteria, if introduced back i'nto  body by means of inoculation, can have beneficial effects and speed up  development of our natural defences, the antibodies which arc capable of fighting and blocking an invading disease. (4) So the same bacteria that produce a disease can also produce in us  extra defences our body heads to fight against the disease. (5) Louis pastcur was the great French chemist and biologist who saved a nmc-year-old boy from Alsace in France.

(1) Maccines arc developed to fight diseases. (2) For example, when disease bacteria are dead, or they have lost then danger, they can be used for good purposes. (3) Fasteur discovered that inactive bacteria, if introduced back i'nto  body by means of inoculation, can have beneficial effects and speed up development of our natural defences, the antibodies which arc capable of fighting and blocking an invading disease. (4) So the same bacteria that produce a disease can also produce in us  extra defences our body heads to fight against the disease. (5) Louis pastcur was the great French chemist and biologist who saved a nmc-year-old boy from Alsace in France.

(1) Maccines arc developed to fight diseases. (2) For example, when  disease bacteria are dead, or they have lost then danger, they can be used for good purposes. (3) Fasteur discovered that inactive bacteria, if introduced back i'nto  body by means of inoculation, can have beneficial effects and speed up  development of our natural defences, the antibodies which arc capable of fighting and blocking an invading disease. (4) So the same bacteria that produce a disease can also produce in us  extra defences our body heads to fight against the disease. (5) Louis pastcur was the great French chemist and biologist who saved a nmc-year-old boy from Alsace in France.

The potentials of solar energy are great. The total amount of solar energy reaching the earth each year is over 30,000 times as much as the total energy used by man. liven a very small satellite in orbit round the parth can be used (60) twice as much electricity as the largest (61) power station, !for a long time men (62) to use solar energy because sunshine is not something which is constant and thus always available, especially in temperate and cold climates. The direction of the sun’s rays varies, too, however, during the past two hundred years significant _(63)_ have been made in the use of solar energy _(64)_ heat and mom recently to produce electricity During the nineteenth century,(65)___solar steam generators were built. These generators consisted of mirrors thrit could be moved and could thus concentrate large amounts of (66) from the sun on blackened pipes through which water was circulated. In this way the water was turned to steam. Even ice (67) by a similar method a hundred years ago in Paris.

the potentials of solar energy are great. the total amount of solar energy reaching the earth each year is over 30,000 times as much as the total energy used by man. liven a very small satellite in orbit round the parth can be used (60) twice as much electricity as the largest (61) power station, for a long time men (62) to use solar energy because sunshine is not something which is constant and thus always available, especially in temperate and cold climates. The direction of آه sun’s rays varies, too, however, during the past two hundred years significant _(63)_ have been made in the use of solar energy _(64)_ heat and mom recently to produce electricity During the nineteenth century, (6ر (ئ solar steam generators were built. These generators consisted of mirrors thrit could be moved and could thus concentrate large amounts of (66) from آه sun on blackened pipes through which water was circulated. In this way the water was turned to steam. Even ice (67) by a similar method a hundred years ago in Paris

____ after working for the company for then twenty years, Alan started taking up farming seriously.

 

“What did the speaker say at the seminar?’

___ while they are wathing TV is very important’.

 

‘My little sister broke the antique vase 1 bought last year.’

As I found out that not all آه workshop participants knew about today’s schedule, 1 got my secretary ___ it right away.

Tari was punished by the teacher not only because she forgot to bring her book ____

My brother is in the intensive care unit now. I ____ him to the doctor earlier before he got worse.

____their village is located in the dangerous zone of Mt. Merapi, the people do not want to leave their home.

Has there been anew policy about sick leaves?’ ‘1 don’t know, 1 don’t remember _____ about it.’

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